How to Negotiate Salary For a New Job – 5 Salary Negotiation Tips That Work

One of the trickiest parts of getting employed is figuring out how to negotiate salary for a new job. There are just so many things to consider. After all, you want a high salary but you don’t want to appear self-important. You’re afraid of giving numbers, and yet you dream of increased pay.

Well, you don’t have to worry about those things anymore. If you want to know how to negotiate salary for a new job, simply read this article!

Salary Negotiation Tip # 1: Do Your Research.

So you want to learn how to negotiate salary for a new job? Then you must do your research first. Find out what people in the industry are making.

If you’re going for an entry-level position, find out what entry-levels are making. If you’re going for a managerial position, find out what they’re making. This way, you won’t sound like an idiot when you eventually negotiate your salary for a new job.

Salary Negotiation Tip # 2: Assess Yourself.

Personal assessment is important; and it’s not just so you’ll have something to say at an interview! Knowing your strengths and skills helps you become more confident when negotiating salary for a new job.

You might have certain skills that are useful, but not quite common in the workplace. For example, you might be applying for the writer position at the company, but you also know how to design websites or speak fluently in three different languages. I’d say that would give you a better leverage!

Salary Negotiation Tip # 3: Be Confident.

When talking money, it’s important that you appear confident. Not arrogant, but confident. Demanding a high salary, especially when you don’t have good credentials, will only turn you into a laughing stock.

Salary Negotiation Tip # 4: Refrain From Giving an Exact Amount…Yet.

If you’re not yet sure whether they’ll be hiring you or not, it would be in your best interest not to discuss salary in detail.

You can give a certain range, but you should also add that it’s negotiable and flexible. This way, the company won’t cast your resume aside at once (especially if it turns out that they can’t afford to hire you).

Salary Negotiation Tip # 5: Be Willing To Walk Away.

Finding a decent job with good pay can be challenging. However, that doesn’t mean you have to accept a rate that is beyond low. You might be flexible, but you’re not that desperate.

When a company low blows you, be prepared to walk away. There are other companies out there that will treat you fairly.

Learning how to negotiate salary for a new job can be eye-opening, but the actual experience can vary. Learn all you can from what you have experienced yourself, and use those lessons on your next salary negotiation.

The Art of Presentation in a Cyber World

As a trainer or presenter you know what to do – you’ve probably been doing it for years. You know how to engage your audience, you know the body language to watch for, you know how to make eye contact and to include your audience in a wide sweep so that everyone feels involved in your presentation. You know how to stand, what slides to use, when not to use slides, you know that the tenor of your voice can be used to emphasize points and that you can question your audience to develop a point. You are confident in your subject and you know exactly what is expected of you.

So, why are you sweating? Why are you looking at your slides and wondering if it will work and whether what you are going to say is actually going to make a difference? Because they changed the goal posts! Whether you like it or not, presenting and training is taking on a new dimension – that of the cyber world.
 
The rules and the practices that work so well live are all of a sudden ‘old hat’. You will be in front of your audience, but instead of standing there in your smart suit or your jeans and tee shirt, or (for the more extrovert) in your Hawaiian shirt and hula skirt – all your delegates could potentially see is your face. And up close and personal too! Every twitch, every flick of the hair or scratch of the ear that is so easy to use as a pause in speech when you are standing live in front of your audience is suddenly brought into sharp focus. Your facial expressions are watched closely by your audience – which could number hundreds – and you give everything away.
 
Yes, it’s a different world. The use of cyber-training with technology such as Webex TM, and GoToMeeting┬«, (to name but two of the many systems out there) means that you can deliver ‘live’ training to a remote audience. And not just remote from you – they could be remote from each other in both geographical and time-zone terms. So your methods of engaging the audience have to change. You can’t rely on the internet communicating your natural charisma, unfortunately.

But good performance is good performance, and the key to ensuring success through new technology is the same as it was for live performance – practice. But there are other elements that need to change. Whereas live you may need few or even no slides, when you are presenting your ideas on the web, it is quite likely that you will need a really engaging slide show to keep the audience watching. After all – they are probably sitting at their computer, and a little note may pop up saying they have a new email from a client – and they will be highly tempted to go and take a quick peek…
 
The screen of their computer suddenly becomes your training room. They can stand up and ‘walk out’ on you with no embarrassment whatsoever! They can see you, but you won’t be able to see them and nor will the other delegates. So their exit, should they chose to make it, is relatively painless. 
 
You may need far more slides than for a live presentation, you will probably need less words but far more pictures, far more interactive elements and opportunities for delegates to contribute their thoughts and comments using the technology. Your delivery can still be interactive and you can have break-out sessions, shared virtual white-boards and many other dandy little widgets that your chosen web conferencing provider can entice you with – but you must practice. Don’t just practice your presentation – understand the technology and not only what you want to happen, but what could go wrong. Prepare alternative scenarios or additional material just in case that break-out function is overloaded, or that the server in Spain refuses to play. Above all, make sure the delegates know in advance what is expected of them – and that goes as much for live training as for training over the web.
 
Back to your performance: the tone of your voice is still important, but it will be distanced by the fact you are being heard over a phone line or VOIP. Your body language will still be important, but it will be concentrated around your face or head and shoulders. Think about your colour scheme in relation not just to your surroundings (background to the camera) but to the slides you are showing. Is your bright orange ‘confidence’ suit going to clash with the red corporate banner on the presentation? 
 
And how will your audience react? Will they gain as much benefit from this kind of presentation as they would if they were in the room with you? Having already noted that their ability to ‘opt out’ is far easier on line, just as with live training you will engage people on different levels according to their preferred learning styles. There will be some who are delighted that they don’t have to leave their desk to complete that mandatory CPD module, and others who begrudge the fact that they don’t get their day out of the office and the nice hotel lunch. 
 
Engaging your audience – and keeping them engaged – comes right back down to three key elements: content, presentation and performance. For live training I would perhaps reverse the order, but making sure that what you are saying (content) is relevant and of interest to your audience is crucial for their engagement. Make sure that the presentation method (avoiding infamous ‘death by PowerPoint TM – live or on-line) is appropriate. And finally, your performance must be convincing. You have to know your subject and be ready to respond to questions, you have to be able to improvise and to understand the differences in the media you are using to present and, therefore, how your audience will relate to you.
 
You could argue that cyber-training will never replace live training completely and I would agree; but I would also caution that as the technology develops and the ease of use improves, it is going to be a highly cost effective method for organisations to address remote audiences. Be prepared, and ready to take on board the way technology is changing how we present and train.

Tips for Making a Sales Presentation to a Group

As a free agent, independent professional, and/or freelancer, we are often asked to present a summary of what we offer to a board of trustees, several officers of a company, leaders of an organization, or members of an association. Dealing with more than one person can create a plethora of different considerations and approaches before reaching a successful outcome. In this article, I share some of my experiences with group presentations — what’s worked for me and what to watch out for.

Find out as much as you can before meeting with a group. I do a good bit of work for non-profits. These corporations all have vocal boards of trustees to whom they must answer when the spending of a considerable amount of money is involved. The more information I have about the corporation and its leaders, the better. If possible, I try to connect before the “big meeting” with the executive director and find out exactly what they are seeking and how much they are planning to spend — most non-profits, for example, vote on a yearly budget at the end of their fiscal year, so know exactly how much they have ear-marked for a project.

Others are putting out feelers to find out how much — or how little — they should set aside for the project. Oftentimes, there is background information you can discover. A lot of proposed projects have been in the works for awhile and have quite a history. Ask lots of questions and do all of the research possible. For example, I just finished an extensive website for a group that I discovered had initially talked with and had been turned down by many of the big design firms in town. I believe that I got the job because I was willing to take the time to meet with their board, listen to their suggestions and do the custom work they desired.

Prepare, prepare, prepare. No matter what kind of presentation you are making — whether to two people, twenty people or two hundred people — proper preparation is the key. First of all, know what your goal for the meeting is and have a plan and strategy ready. Write down the information you want the group to know about you and your services by the end of the presentation. What makes you unique and why should they hire you?

Realize that just telling them this is not going to work. You must create the right questions to ask them so that they will ask you the right questions. This is the way you will discover what it is they are looking for and whether or not you can help them get it. The operative word is “help.” When others feel that you care about them and their problems, that you are on their side and ready to help, they will be much more willing to open up and form a bond with you. You will also learn what you need to do to please them.